Block (periodic table)

  • a long periodic table showing, from left to right: the s-, d-, f-, and p-blocks. the f-block, normally shown as a footnote, here splits the d-block into two. this splitting is not universally agreed on; although it is the more common form in the literature, there is substantial opposition to it from many sources focusing on the placement of elements in the periodic table.[1]

    a block of the periodic table is a set of elements unified by the orbitals their valence electrons or vacancies lie in.[1] the term appears to have been first used by charles janet.[2] each block is named after its characteristic orbital: s-block, p-block, d-block, and f-block.

    the block names (s, p, d, and f) are derived from the spectroscopic notation for the value of an electron's azimuthal quantum number: sharp (0), principal (1), diffuse (2), or fundamental (3). succeeding notations proceed in alphabetical order, as g, h, etc.

  • characteristics
  • symmetry
  • see also
  • references
  • external links

A long periodic table showing, from left to right: the s-, d-, f-, and p-blocks. The f-block, normally shown as a footnote, here splits the d-block into two. This splitting is not universally agreed on; although it is the more common form in the literature, there is substantial opposition to it from many sources focusing on the placement of elements in the periodic table.[1]

A block of the periodic table is a set of elements unified by the orbitals their valence electrons or vacancies lie in.[1] The term appears to have been first used by Charles Janet.[2] Each block is named after its characteristic orbital: s-block, p-block, d-block, and f-block.

The block names (s, p, d, and f) are derived from the spectroscopic notation for the value of an electron's azimuthal quantum number: sharp (0), principal (1), diffuse (2), or fundamental (3). Succeeding notations proceed in alphabetical order, as g, h, etc.