Curie

  • curie
    radium226.jpg
    a sample of radium, the element which was used in the original definition of the curie.
    general information
    unit ofspecific activity
    symbolci 
    named afterpierre curie
    conversions
    1 ci in ...... is equal to ...
       rutherfords   37000 rd
       si derived unit   37 gbq
       si base unit   3.7×1010 s−1

    the curie (symbol ci) is a non-si unit of radioactivity originally defined in 1910. according to a notice in nature at the time, it was named in honour of pierre curie,[1] but was considered at least by some to be in honour of marie curie as well.[2]

    it was originally defined as "the quantity or mass of radium emanation in equilibrium with one gram of radium (element)" [1] but is currently defined as 1 ci = 3.7×1010 decays per second after more accurate measurements of the activity of 226ra (which has a specific activity of 3.66×1010 bq/g[3]).

    in 1975 the general conference on weights and measures gave the becquerel (bq), defined as one nuclear decay per second, official status as the si unit of activity.[4] therefore:

    1 ci = 3.7×1010 bq = 37 gbq

    and

    1 bq ≅ 2.703×10−11 ci ≅ 27 pci

    while its continued use is discouraged by national institute of standards and technology (nist)[5] and other bodies, the curie is still widely used throughout government, industry and medicine in the united states and in other countries.

    at the 1910 meeting which originally defined the curie, it was proposed to make it equivalent to 10 nanograms of radium (a practical amount). but marie curie, after initially accepting this, changed her mind and insisted on one gram of radium. according to bertram boltwood, marie curie thought that 'the use of the name "curie" for so infinitesimally small [a] quantity of anything was altogether inappropriate.'[2]

    the power in milliwatts emitted by one curie of radiation can be calculated by taking the number of mev for the radiation times approximately 5.93.

    a radiotherapy machine may have roughly 1000 ci of a radioisotope such as caesium-137 or cobalt-60. this quantity of radioactivity can produce serious health effects with only a few minutes of close-range, unshielded exposure.

    ingesting even a millicurie is usually fatal (unless it is a very short-lived isotope). for example, the median lethal dose (ld-50) for ingested polonium-210 is 240 μci; about 53.5 nanograms.

    the typical human body contains roughly 0.1 μci (14 mg) of naturally occurring potassium-40. a human body containing 16 kg of carbon (see composition of the human body) would also have about 24 nanograms or 0.1 μci of carbon-14. together, these would result in a total of approximately 0.2 μci or 7400 decays per second inside the person's body (mostly from beta decay but some from gamma decay).


  • as a measure of quantity
  • radiation related quantities
  • see also
  • references

Curie
Radium226.jpg
A sample of radium, the element which was used in the original definition of the curie.
General information
Unit ofSpecific activity
SymbolCi 
Named afterPierre Curie
Conversions
1 Ci in ...... is equal to ...
   rutherfords   37000 Rd
   SI derived unit   37 GBq
   SI base unit   3.7×1010 s−1

The curie (symbol Ci) is a non-SI unit of radioactivity originally defined in 1910. According to a notice in Nature at the time, it was named in honour of Pierre Curie,[1] but was considered at least by some to be in honour of Marie Curie as well.[2]

It was originally defined as "the quantity or mass of radium emanation in equilibrium with one gram of radium (element)" [1] but is currently defined as 1 Ci = 3.7×1010 decays per second after more accurate measurements of the activity of 226Ra (which has a specific activity of 3.66×1010 Bq/g[3]).

In 1975 the General Conference on Weights and Measures gave the becquerel (Bq), defined as one nuclear decay per second, official status as the SI unit of activity.[4] Therefore:

1 Ci = 3.7×1010 Bq = 37 GBq

and

1 Bq ≅ 2.703×10−11 Ci ≅ 27 pCi

While its continued use is discouraged by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)[5] and other bodies, the curie is still widely used throughout government, industry and medicine in the United States and in other countries.

At the 1910 meeting which originally defined the curie, it was proposed to make it equivalent to 10 nanograms of radium (a practical amount). But Marie Curie, after initially accepting this, changed her mind and insisted on one gram of radium. According to Bertram Boltwood, Marie Curie thought that 'the use of the name "curie" for so infinitesimally small [a] quantity of anything was altogether inappropriate.'[2]

The power in milliwatts emitted by one curie of radiation can be calculated by taking the number of MeV for the radiation times approximately 5.93.

A radiotherapy machine may have roughly 1000 Ci of a radioisotope such as caesium-137 or cobalt-60. This quantity of radioactivity can produce serious health effects with only a few minutes of close-range, unshielded exposure.

Ingesting even a millicurie is usually fatal (unless it is a very short-lived isotope). For example, the median lethal dose (LD-50) for ingested polonium-210 is 240 μCi; about 53.5 nanograms.

The typical human body contains roughly 0.1 μCi (14 mg) of naturally occurring potassium-40. A human body containing 16 kg of carbon (see Composition of the human body) would also have about 24 nanograms or 0.1 μCi of carbon-14. Together, these would result in a total of approximately 0.2 μCi or 7400 decays per second inside the person's body (mostly from beta decay but some from gamma decay).