Oganesson

  • oganesson, 118og
    oganesson
    pronunciation
    • n/[1]
      (nes-on)
    • n/
      (nes-on)
    mass number[294] (unconfirmed: 295)
    oganesson in the periodic table
    hydrogen helium
    lithium beryllium boron carbon nitrogen oxygen fluorine neon
    sodium magnesium aluminium silicon phosphorus sulfur chlorine argon
    potassium calcium scandium titanium vanadium chromium manganese iron cobalt nickel copper zinc gallium germanium arsenic selenium bromine krypton
    rubidium strontium yttrium zirconium niobium molybdenum technetium ruthenium rhodium palladium silver cadmium indium tin antimony tellurium iodine xenon
    caesium barium lanthanum cerium praseodymium neodymium promethium samarium europium gadolinium terbium dysprosium holmium erbium thulium ytterbium lutetium hafnium tantalum tungsten rhenium osmium iridium platinum gold mercury (element) thallium lead bismuth polonium astatine radon
    francium radium actinium thorium protactinium uranium neptunium plutonium americium curium berkelium californium einsteinium fermium mendelevium nobelium lawrencium rutherfordium dubnium seaborgium bohrium hassium meitnerium darmstadtium roentgenium copernicium nihonium flerovium moscovium livermorium tennessine oganesson
    rn

    og

    (usb)
    tennessineoganessonununennium
    atomic number (z)118
    groupgroup 18
    periodperiod 7
    blockp-block
    element category  unknown chemical properties, was expected to be a noble gas; now predicted to be metallic-looking reactive solid, and either a semiconductor (possibly a metalloid) or a post-transition metal[2][3]
    electron configuration[rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 7p6 (predicted)[4][5]
    electrons per shell2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 18, 8 (predicted)
    physical properties
    phase at stpsolid (predicted)[4]
    melting point320 k ​(50 °c, ​120 °f) (predicted)[6]
    boiling point350±30 k ​(80±30 °c, ​170±50 °f) (extrapolated)[4]
    density (near r.t.)4.9–5.1 g/cm3 (predicted)[7]
    critical point439 k, 6.8 mpa (extrapolated)[8]
    heat of fusion23.5 kj/mol (extrapolated)[8]
    heat of vaporization19.4 kj/mol (extrapolated)[8]
    atomic properties
    oxidation states(−1),[5] (0), (+1),[9] (+2),[10] (+4),[10] (+6)[5] (predicted)
    ionization energies
    • 1st: 860.1 kj/mol (predicted)[11]
    • 2nd: 1560 kj/mol (predicted)[12]
    covalent radius157 pm (predicted)[13]
    other properties
    natural occurrencesynthetic
    crystal structureface-centered cubic (fcc)
    face-centered cubic crystal structure for oganesson

    (extrapolated)[14]
    cas number54144-19-3
    history
    namingafter yuri oganessian
    predictionhans peter jørgen julius thomsen (1895)
    discoveryjoint institute for nuclear research and lawrence livermore national laboratory (2002)
    main isotopes of oganesson
    iso­tope abun­dance half-life (t1/2) decay mode pro­duct
    294og[15] syn 0.69 ms[16] α 290lv
    sf
    295og[17] syn 181 ms? α 291lv
    category category: oganesson
    | references

    oganesson is a synthetic chemical element with the symbol og and atomic number 118. it was first synthesized in 2002 at the joint institute for nuclear research (jinr) in dubna, near moscow, russia, by a joint team of russian and american scientists. in december 2015, it was recognized as one of four new elements by the joint working party of the international scientific bodies iupac and iupap. it was formally named on 28 november 2016.[18][19] the name is in line with the tradition of honoring a scientist, in this case the nuclear physicist yuri oganessian, who has played a leading role in the discovery of the heaviest elements in the periodic table. it is one of only two elements named after a person who was alive at the time of naming, the other being seaborgium, and the only element whose namesake is alive today.[20]

    oganesson has the highest atomic number and highest atomic mass of all known elements. the radioactive oganesson atom is very unstable, and since 2005, only five (possibly six) atoms of the isotope 294og have been detected.[21] although this allowed very little experimental characterization of its properties and possible compounds, theoretical calculations have resulted in many predictions, including some surprising ones. for example, although oganesson is a member of group 18 (the noble gases) – the first synthetic element to be so – it may be significantly reactive, unlike all the other elements of that group.[4] it was formerly thought to be a gas under normal conditions but is now predicted to be a solid due to relativistic effects.[4] on the periodic table of the elements it is a p-block element and the last one of period 7.

  • introduction
  • history
  • characteristics
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • bibliography
  • further reading
  • external links

Oganesson, 118Og
Oganesson
Pronunciation
Mass number[294] (unconfirmed: 295)
Oganesson in the periodic table
Hydrogen Helium
Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon
Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon
Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium Chromium Manganese Iron Cobalt Nickel Copper Zinc Gallium Germanium Arsenic Selenium Bromine Krypton
Rubidium Strontium Yttrium Zirconium Niobium Molybdenum Technetium Ruthenium Rhodium Palladium Silver Cadmium Indium Tin Antimony Tellurium Iodine Xenon
Caesium Barium Lanthanum Cerium Praseodymium Neodymium Promethium Samarium Europium Gadolinium Terbium Dysprosium Holmium Erbium Thulium Ytterbium Lutetium Hafnium Tantalum Tungsten Rhenium Osmium Iridium Platinum Gold Mercury (element) Thallium Lead Bismuth Polonium Astatine Radon
Francium Radium Actinium Thorium Protactinium Uranium Neptunium Plutonium Americium Curium Berkelium Californium Einsteinium Fermium Mendelevium Nobelium Lawrencium Rutherfordium Dubnium Seaborgium Bohrium Hassium Meitnerium Darmstadtium Roentgenium Copernicium Nihonium Flerovium Moscovium Livermorium Tennessine Oganesson
Rn

Og

(Usb)
tennessineoganessonununennium
Atomic number (Z)118
Groupgroup 18
Periodperiod 7
Blockp-block
Element category  Unknown chemical properties, was expected to be a noble gas; now predicted to be metallic-looking reactive solid, and either a semiconductor (possibly a metalloid) or a post-transition metal[2][3]
Electron configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 7p6 (predicted)[4][5]
Electrons per shell2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 18, 8 (predicted)
Physical properties
Phase at STPsolid (predicted)[4]
Melting point320 K ​(50 °C, ​120 °F) (predicted)[6]
Boiling point350±30 K ​(80±30 °C, ​170±50 °F) (extrapolated)[4]
Density (near r.t.)4.9–5.1 g/cm3 (predicted)[7]
Critical point439 K, 6.8 MPa (extrapolated)[8]
Heat of fusion23.5 kJ/mol (extrapolated)[8]
Heat of vaporization19.4 kJ/mol (extrapolated)[8]
Atomic properties
Oxidation states(−1),[5] (0), (+1),[9] (+2),[10] (+4),[10] (+6)[5] (predicted)
Ionization energies
  • 1st: 860.1 kJ/mol (predicted)[11]
  • 2nd: 1560 kJ/mol (predicted)[12]
Covalent radius157 pm (predicted)[13]
Other properties
Natural occurrencesynthetic
Crystal structureface-centered cubic (fcc)
Face-centered cubic crystal structure for oganesson

(extrapolated)[14]
CAS Number54144-19-3
History
Namingafter Yuri Oganessian
PredictionHans Peter Jørgen Julius Thomsen (1895)
DiscoveryJoint Institute for Nuclear Research and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (2002)
Main isotopes of oganesson
Iso­tope Abun­dance Half-life (t1/2) Decay mode Pro­duct
294Og[15] syn 0.69 ms[16] α 290Lv
SF
295Og[17] syn 181 ms? α 291Lv
Category Category: Oganesson
| references

Oganesson is a synthetic chemical element with the symbol Og and atomic number 118. It was first synthesized in 2002 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, near Moscow, Russia, by a joint team of Russian and American scientists. In December 2015, it was recognized as one of four new elements by the Joint Working Party of the international scientific bodies IUPAC and IUPAP. It was formally named on 28 November 2016.[18][19] The name is in line with the tradition of honoring a scientist, in this case the nuclear physicist Yuri Oganessian, who has played a leading role in the discovery of the heaviest elements in the periodic table. It is one of only two elements named after a person who was alive at the time of naming, the other being seaborgium, and the only element whose namesake is alive today.[20]

Oganesson has the highest atomic number and highest atomic mass of all known elements. The radioactive oganesson atom is very unstable, and since 2005, only five (possibly six) atoms of the isotope 294Og have been detected.[21] Although this allowed very little experimental characterization of its properties and possible compounds, theoretical calculations have resulted in many predictions, including some surprising ones. For example, although oganesson is a member of group 18 (the noble gases) – the first synthetic element to be so – it may be significantly reactive, unlike all the other elements of that group.[4] It was formerly thought to be a gas under normal conditions but is now predicted to be a solid due to relativistic effects.[4] On the periodic table of the elements it is a p-block element and the last one of period 7.