Polonide

  • a space-filling representation of the crystal structure of magnesium polonide: mg2+ ions are shown in green, while po2− ions are shown in brown.

    a polonide is a chemical compound of the radioactive element polonium with any element less electronegative than polonium.[1] polonides are usually prepared by a direct reaction between the elements at temperatures of around 300–400 °c.[2][3] they are amongst the most chemically stable compounds of polonium,[4] and can be divided into two broad groups:

    • ionic polonides, which appear to contain the po2− anion;
    • intermetallic polonides, in which the bonding is more complex.

    some polonides are intermediate between these two cases and others are non-stoichiometric compounds. alloys containing polonium are also classed as polonides. as polonium is immediately below tellurium in the periodic table, there are many chemical and structural similarities between polonides and tellurides.

  • naturally occurring polonides
  • ionic polonides
  • intermetallic polonides
  • references

A space-filling representation of the crystal structure of magnesium polonide: Mg2+ ions are shown in green, while Po2− ions are shown in brown.

A polonide is a chemical compound of the radioactive element polonium with any element less electronegative than polonium.[1] Polonides are usually prepared by a direct reaction between the elements at temperatures of around 300–400 °C.[2][3] They are amongst the most chemically stable compounds of polonium,[4] and can be divided into two broad groups:

  • ionic polonides, which appear to contain the Po2− anion;
  • intermetallic polonides, in which the bonding is more complex.

Some polonides are intermediate between these two cases and others are non-stoichiometric compounds. Alloys containing polonium are also classed as polonides. As polonium is immediately below tellurium in the periodic table, there are many chemical and structural similarities between polonides and tellurides.