Polonium hydride

Polonium hydride
Space-filling model of the hydrogen polonide molecule
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Polonium hydride
Systematic IUPAC name
Polane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
25163, 169602
Properties
PoH2
Molar mass210.998 g/mol
Melting point −35.3 °C (−31.5 °F; 237.8 K)[1]
Boiling point 36.1 °C (97.0 °F; 309.2 K)[1]
Related compounds
Other anions
H2O
H2S
H2Se
H2Te
Other cations
TlH3
PbH4
BiH3
HAt
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Polonium hydride (also known as polonium dihydride, hydrogen polonide, or polane) is a chemical compound with the formula PoH2. It is a liquid at room temperature, the second hydrogen chalcogenide with this property after water. It is very unstable chemically and tends to decompose into elemental polonium and hydrogen; like all polonium compounds, it is highly radioactive. It is a volatile and very labile compound, from which many polonides can be derived.[2]

Preparation

Polonium hydride cannot be produced by direct reaction from the elements upon heating. Other unsuccessful routes to synthesis include the reaction of polonium tetrachloride (PoCl4) with lithium aluminium hydride (LiAlH4), which only produces elemental polonium, and the reaction of hydrochloric acid with magnesium polonide (MgPo). The fact that these synthesis routes do not work may be caused by the radiolysis of polonium hydride upon formation.[3]

Trace quantities of polonium hydride may be prepared by reacting hydrochloric acid with polonium-plated magnesium foil. In addition, the diffusion of trace quantities of polonium in palladium or platinum that is saturated with hydrogen (see palladium hydride) may be due to the formation and migration of polonium hydride.[3]

Experiments conducted on the trace scale show indications that the reaction between polonium metal and nascent hydrogen may produce polonium hydride.[3]