Spectral line

  • continuous spectrum
    continuous spectrum
    emission lines
    emission lines (discrete spectrum)
    absorption lines
    absorption lines (discrete spectrum)
    absorption lines for air, under indirect illumination, with the direct light source not visible, so that the gas is not directly between source and detector. here, fraunhofer lines in sunlight and rayleigh scattering of this sunlight is the "source." this is the spectrum of a blue sky somewhat close to the horizon, pointing east at around 3 or 4 pm (i.e., sun toward the west) on a clear day.

    a spectral line is a dark or bright line in an otherwise uniform and continuous spectrum, resulting from emission or absorption of light in a narrow frequency range, compared with the nearby frequencies. spectral lines are often used to identify atoms and molecules. these "fingerprints" can be compared to the previously collected "fingerprints" of atoms and molecules,[1] and are thus used to identify the atomic and molecular components of stars and planets, which would otherwise be impossible.

  • types of line spectra
  • nomenclature
  • line broadening and shift
  • spectral lines of chemical elements
  • see also
  • notes
  • references
  • further reading

Continuous spectrum
Continuous spectrum
Absorption lines
Absorption lines (discrete spectrum)
Absorption lines for air, under indirect illumination, with the direct light source not visible, so that the gas is not directly between source and detector. Here, Fraunhofer lines in sunlight and Rayleigh scattering of this sunlight is the "source." This is the spectrum of a blue sky somewhat close to the horizon, pointing east at around 3 or 4 pm (i.e., Sun toward the west) on a clear day.

A spectral line is a dark or bright line in an otherwise uniform and continuous spectrum, resulting from emission or absorption of light in a narrow frequency range, compared with the nearby frequencies. Spectral lines are often used to identify atoms and molecules. These "fingerprints" can be compared to the previously collected "fingerprints" of atoms and molecules,[1] and are thus used to identify the atomic and molecular components of stars and planets, which would otherwise be impossible.