Tennessine

  • tennessine, 117ts
    tennessine
    pronunciationn/[1] (ten-ə-seen)
    appearancesemimetallic (predicted)[2]
    mass number[294]
    tennessine in the periodic table
    hydrogen helium
    lithium beryllium boron carbon nitrogen oxygen fluorine neon
    sodium magnesium aluminium silicon phosphorus sulfur chlorine argon
    potassium calcium scandium titanium vanadium chromium manganese iron cobalt nickel copper zinc gallium germanium arsenic selenium bromine krypton
    rubidium strontium yttrium zirconium niobium molybdenum technetium ruthenium rhodium palladium silver cadmium indium tin antimony tellurium iodine xenon
    caesium barium lanthanum cerium praseodymium neodymium promethium samarium europium gadolinium terbium dysprosium holmium erbium thulium ytterbium lutetium hafnium tantalum tungsten rhenium osmium iridium platinum gold mercury (element) thallium lead bismuth polonium astatine radon
    francium radium actinium thorium protactinium uranium neptunium plutonium americium curium berkelium californium einsteinium fermium mendelevium nobelium lawrencium rutherfordium dubnium seaborgium bohrium hassium meitnerium darmstadtium roentgenium copernicium nihonium flerovium moscovium livermorium tennessine oganesson
    at

    ts

    (usu)
    livermoriumtennessineoganesson
    atomic number (z)117
    groupgroup 17
    periodperiod 7
    blockp-block
    element category  unknown chemical properties, but probably a post-transition metal[3][4]
    electron configuration[rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 7p5 (predicted)[5]
    electrons per shell2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 18, 7 (predicted)
    physical properties
    phase at stpsolid (predicted)[5][6]
    melting point623–823 k ​(350–550 °c, ​662–1022 °f) (predicted)[5]
    boiling point883 k ​(610 °c, ​1130 °f) (predicted)[5]
    density (near r.t.)7.1–7.3 g/cm3 (extrapolated)[6]
    atomic properties
    oxidation states(−1), (+1), (+3), (+5) (predicted)[2][5]
    ionization energies
    • 1st: 742.9 kj/mol (predicted)[7]
    • 2nd: 1435.4 kj/mol (predicted)[7]
    • 3rd: 2161.9 kj/mol (predicted)[7]
    • (more)
    atomic radiusempirical: 138 pm (predicted)[6]
    covalent radius156–157 pm (extrapolated)[6]
    other properties
    natural occurrencesynthetic
    cas number54101-14-3
    history
    namingafter tennessee region
    discoveryjoint institute for nuclear research, lawrence livermore national laboratory, vanderbilt university and oak ridge national laboratory (2009)
    main isotopes of tennessine
    iso­tope abun­dance half-life (t1/2) decay mode pro­duct
    293ts[8] syn 22 ms α 289mc
    294ts[9] syn 51 ms α 290mc
    | references

    tennessine is a synthetic chemical element with the symbol ts and atomic number 117. it is the second-heaviest known element and the penultimate element of the 7th period of the periodic table.

    the discovery of tennessine was officially announced in dubna, russia, by a russian–american collaboration in april 2010, which makes it the most recently discovered element as of 2020. one of its daughter isotopes was created directly in 2011, partially confirming the results of the experiment. the experiment itself was repeated successfully by the same collaboration in 2012 and by a joint german–american team in may 2014. in december 2015, the joint working party of the international union of pure and applied chemistry (iupac) and the international union of pure and applied physics, which evaluates claims of discovery of new elements, recognized the element and assigned the priority to the russian–american team. in june 2016, the iupac published a declaration stating that the discoverers had suggested the name tennessine after tennessee, united states.[a] in november 2016, they officially adopted the name "tennessine".

    tennessine may be located in the "island of stability", a concept that explains why some superheavy elements are more stable compared to an overall trend of decreasing stability for elements beyond bismuth on the periodic table. the synthesized tennessine atoms have lasted tens and hundreds of milliseconds. in the periodic table, tennessine is expected to be a member of group 17, all other members of which are halogens.[b] some of its properties may significantly differ from those of the halogens due to relativistic effects. as a result, tennessine is expected to be a volatile metal that neither forms anions nor achieves high oxidation states. a few key properties, such as its melting and boiling points and its first ionization energy, are nevertheless expected to follow the periodic trends of the halogens.

  • history
  • predicted properties
  • notes
  • references

Tennessine, 117Ts
Tennessine
Pronunciationn/[1] (TEN-ə-seen)
Appearancesemimetallic (predicted)[2]
Mass number[294]
Tennessine in the periodic table
Hydrogen Helium
Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon
Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon
Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium Chromium Manganese Iron Cobalt Nickel Copper Zinc Gallium Germanium Arsenic Selenium Bromine Krypton
Rubidium Strontium Yttrium Zirconium Niobium Molybdenum Technetium Ruthenium Rhodium Palladium Silver Cadmium Indium Tin Antimony Tellurium Iodine Xenon
Caesium Barium Lanthanum Cerium Praseodymium Neodymium Promethium Samarium Europium Gadolinium Terbium Dysprosium Holmium Erbium Thulium Ytterbium Lutetium Hafnium Tantalum Tungsten Rhenium Osmium Iridium Platinum Gold Mercury (element) Thallium Lead Bismuth Polonium Astatine Radon
Francium Radium Actinium Thorium Protactinium Uranium Neptunium Plutonium Americium Curium Berkelium Californium Einsteinium Fermium Mendelevium Nobelium Lawrencium Rutherfordium Dubnium Seaborgium Bohrium Hassium Meitnerium Darmstadtium Roentgenium Copernicium Nihonium Flerovium Moscovium Livermorium Tennessine Oganesson
At

Ts

(Usu)
livermoriumtennessineoganesson
Atomic number (Z)117
Groupgroup 17
Periodperiod 7
Blockp-block
Element category  Unknown chemical properties, but probably a post-transition metal[3][4]
Electron configuration[Rn] 5f14 6d10 7s2 7p5 (predicted)[5]
Electrons per shell2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 18, 7 (predicted)
Physical properties
Phase at STPsolid (predicted)[5][6]
Melting point623–823 K ​(350–550 °C, ​662–1022 °F) (predicted)[5]
Boiling point883 K ​(610 °C, ​1130 °F) (predicted)[5]
Density (near r.t.)7.1–7.3 g/cm3 (extrapolated)[6]
Atomic properties
Oxidation states(−1), (+1), (+3), (+5) (predicted)[2][5]
Ionization energies
  • 1st: 742.9 kJ/mol (predicted)[7]
  • 2nd: 1435.4 kJ/mol (predicted)[7]
  • 3rd: 2161.9 kJ/mol (predicted)[7]
  • (more)
Atomic radiusempirical: 138 pm (predicted)[6]
Covalent radius156–157 pm (extrapolated)[6]
Other properties
Natural occurrencesynthetic
CAS Number54101-14-3
History
Namingafter Tennessee region
DiscoveryJoint Institute for Nuclear Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (2009)
Main isotopes of tennessine
Iso­tope Abun­dance Half-life (t1/2) Decay mode Pro­duct
293Ts[8] syn 22 ms α 289Mc
294Ts[9] syn 51 ms α 290Mc
| references

Tennessine is a synthetic chemical element with the symbol Ts and atomic number 117. It is the second-heaviest known element and the penultimate element of the 7th period of the periodic table.

The discovery of tennessine was officially announced in Dubna, Russia, by a Russian–American collaboration in April 2010, which makes it the most recently discovered element as of 2020. One of its daughter isotopes was created directly in 2011, partially confirming the results of the experiment. The experiment itself was repeated successfully by the same collaboration in 2012 and by a joint German–American team in May 2014. In December 2015, the Joint Working Party of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, which evaluates claims of discovery of new elements, recognized the element and assigned the priority to the Russian–American team. In June 2016, the IUPAC published a declaration stating that the discoverers had suggested the name tennessine after Tennessee, United States.[a] In November 2016, they officially adopted the name "tennessine".

Tennessine may be located in the "island of stability", a concept that explains why some superheavy elements are more stable compared to an overall trend of decreasing stability for elements beyond bismuth on the periodic table. The synthesized tennessine atoms have lasted tens and hundreds of milliseconds. In the periodic table, tennessine is expected to be a member of group 17, all other members of which are halogens.[b] Some of its properties may significantly differ from those of the halogens due to relativistic effects. As a result, tennessine is expected to be a volatile metal that neither forms anions nor achieves high oxidation states. A few key properties, such as its melting and boiling points and its first ionization energy, are nevertheless expected to follow the periodic trends of the halogens.